Site History

Martin receiving award for ‘Best CL for Fishing 2008’

 

The grounds on which Little End Corner caravan site and fishing pond sit were once just a flat field.  It is the life’s work and legacy of one man’s vision and dedication that have made it what it is today.

Martin Faulder developed the area by having the pond dug out in the mid 1980s. He planted the pond with reeds and rushes around the banks, weeping willows to cascade over idyllic spots, lillies to provide shelter for the fish, cobnut hedging to protect anglers from the wind and specimen trees in specific locations as well as many other plants, shrubs and bulbs to totally transform the desolate field into what has become a haven for native and migratory wildlife.

The pond was initially stocked with roach, rudd, tench, bream, perch, eels, gudgeon, crusian carp, common carp, mirror carp and grass carp of various sizes.  Later barbel and chub, then blue orfe and golden orfe were introduced and all are now flourishing.

Martin developed the caravan site on the adjacent field after the turn of the century, setting up the 5 electric hook ups and hard standings, waste facilities, access roads and an entrance specifically for caravans.  Little End Corner was not overtly advertised but many of those caravan club members who discovered this hidden gem have returned year after year; some from the surrounding area who need not travel far for a relaxing break and some from further afield who choose to make the journey because the value the charm that the site offers.

Many of the returning holiday makers had a good relationship with Martin, who was an unforgettable character.  He always spent the time to get to know his visitors and would often share a beer or two.

Martin passed away in August 2014 and we miss him every day, though through the beauty of the pond and site his legacy remains.  His son James is carrying on the running of Little End Corner and developing the site so more people can enjoy this man-made area of astounding natural beauty.

Site History
Site History
Site History